Do Colleges Require the SSAR/SRAR? Here’s What You Need to Know

By: Susan Kehl | Last Updated: September 9, 2022

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Sometimes it’s better to be safe than SSAR-y.

Nonsensical puns aside, when it comes to college applications and the Self-Reported Student Academic Record (SSAR), questions abound. What is the SSAR, and how does it differ from the Self-Reported Academic Record (SRAR)? When do I complete it?  Do I even need to complete it at all?  Which colleges require the SSAR/SRAR?  

Here’s everything you need to know…

What is the SSAR/SRAR?

The SSAR/SRAR is a self-reported summary of the courses you’ve taken – or will take – in high school. The SSAR/SRAR allows you to electronically submit all of your courses and the grades you’ve earned to participating colleges for admissions consideration. 

Using your high school transcripts for reference, you must accurately enter the required information. If you’re a high school senior, choose the “In Progress” option for any courses not yet completed. If a course doesn’t appear in in the available descriptions built into your SSAR/SRAR, enter the information exactly as it appears on your transcript. 

Once you’re admitted into a college, you’ll be required to submit your final high school transcripts. Colleges will cross-reference your transcripts with the information you entered into your SSAR/SRAR  – so it’s crucial that you enter it precisely. 

What’s the Difference Between the SSAR and the SRAR?

Until recently, students applying to certain Florida colleges and universities completed the SSAR, and students applying to participating colleges in other states completed the SRAR. However, the SSAR and SRAR merged in August 2022. This means that students can now complete either the SSAR or SRAR to submit to participating colleges and universities. 

Independent Educational Consultant Kathy Hart says that now that the SSAR and SRAR are fully integrated, students only need to create a single account. 

 “If students started working on the SSAR prior to August 2022, they will be invited to import the information previously entered into the updated account,” she said. “It’s a straightforward process, and only takes a few minutes.” 

So…Do I Need to Fill out the SSAR/SRAR? 

You only need to complete the SSAR/SRAR if it’s required by the colleges to which you are applying. Find out on a school’s admissions site, and also check the list below. 

Certain applicants are exempt from completing the SSAR/SRAR, including GED graduates, students who didn’t attend high school in the United States, and students who attended schools that don’t use the traditional A-F grading system. Some universities require their own processes to self-report scores. For example, the University of Central Florida only accepts their Self-Provided Academic Record for Knights (SPARK) form. 

It’s important to know which universities require the SSAR/SRAR, because those that do will not review your application until your SSAR/SRAR is submitted.

Colleges and Universities that accept the SSAR-SRAR 
(Source: SRAR/SSAR Support Team, August 2022) 

BAYLOR UNIVERSITY

OPTIONAL

BINGHAMTON UNIVERSITY, STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK

OPTIONAL

CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

REQUIRED

DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY

OPTIONAL

FLORIDA A & M UNIVERSITY

REQUIRED

FLORIDA POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY

OPTIONAL

FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY

REQUIRED

KEAN UNIVERSITY

OPTIONAL

LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY

OPTIONAL

NEW COLLEGE OF FLORIDA

OPTIONAL

NEW YORK UNIVERSITY (NYU)

REQUIRED

PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

REQUIRED

RUTGERS UNIVERSITY, CAMDEN

REQUIRED

RUTGERS UNIVERSITY, NEWARK

REQUIRED

RUTGERS UNIVERSITY, NEW BRUNSWICK

REQUIRED

TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY

REQUIRED

TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY

REQUIRED

UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO, STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK

OPTIONAL

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT

OPTIONAL

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE

REQUIRED

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA TWIN CITIES

REQUIRED

UNIVERSITY OF OREGON

REQUIRED

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

REQUIRED

UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE, KNOXVILLE

REQUIRED

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT SAN ANTONIO

REQUIRED

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

REQUIRED

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH FLORIDA

OPTIONAL

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA

REQUIRED

UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA

REQUIRED

VIRGINIA TECH

REQUIRED 

 

Once you’ve created your account, be sure to frequently visit the “My Colleges and Universities” dashboard on the homepage of your SSAR/SRAR for pertinent information, including the most up-to-date list of participating colleges and universities.

How Do I Submit My SSAR/SRAR?

Once you’ve entered all of the required information,  review and submit your SSAR/SSAR. Although deadlines and linking processes vary between colleges, most ask that students submit their SSAR/SRAR through a portal on the college website after the application has been submitted. Note: Your application is not complete until the university receives your SSAR/SRAR.

Hart says that because each college may have specific requirements, linking processes, and deadlines for the SSAR/SRAR, it’s important to check college admissions pages for university-specific information.

“Students should check their emails regularly for all follow-up instructions after they’ve submitted their applications,” she said. “These emails will include detailed instructions on how to set up the applicant portal and how to link the SSAR/SRAR with the application.”

Filling out the SSAR/SRAR is a simple – yet important – part of the application process for many colleges. Be sure to follow the steps and familiarize yourself with each college’s requirements, because missing a deadline would be an SSAR-y state of affairs (admittedly, that pun was even worse than the first one. SSAR-y. Not SSAR-y).

Need help with your college application? Give us a call. Our team of educational consultants, essay specialists, and college counselors will guide you every step of the way. We’ve helped thousands of students get admitted to their best-fit colleges – and we can help you!

 


Topics: SSAR SRAR

 

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